Sunday, December 30, 2012

Various Citycell Zoom Ultra Internet Modems

Hello Readers,
This post is about various Internet Modems from Citycell Zoom Ultra broadband internet service. Based on info in the web portal of Citycell, I am giving a little description and prices  of all the modems. So, please keep your eyes on regular info, promotions, updates, offers, packages and latest prices about Citycell products.

I have found 5 types of Internet Modem currently provided with Zoom Ultra Connection. Descriptions of each type of modem has given below with images of every modem. For more information's you are requested to visit their site today. 
  • ZTE AC2787
  • ZTE AC682
  • Huawei EC 167
  • Huawei EC 122
  • Harvilon ED 269

ZTE AC2787
* Interface USB 2.0
* CDMA 2000 1X EVDO Rev.A
* Transmission Speed:DL 3.1Mbps, UL 1.8Mbps
* Support SMS
* Supporting extra-large phonebook
* Supporting auto installing and easy uninstall of the driver
* Convenient Plug & Play Support R-UIM
* Micro SD Support: up to 32GB
* Supporting Windows 2000 /XP/Vista/Windows7/MAC/Linux OS
* Current Price: Tk.1,490/-


ZTE AC682
* Interface: USB type
* Convenient Plug & Play
* VIA CBP 7.0 Chipset Version
* Support Voice, SMS, & Micro SD card support up to 4GB
* Superior signal reception through Mobile Receive Diversity
* Handy and portable
* Support R-UIM
* CDMA2000 1x EVDO Rev. A, 800MHz
* Data service of up to DL 3.1Mbps
* Windows XP/Vista/7, Mac and Linux
* Price: Tk.1,490/-


Huawei EC 167
* Interface: Rotatable
* USB type Convenient Plug & Play
* Support Voice, SMS & Micro SD card, support up to 8GB
* Superior signal reception through Mobile Receive Diversity Handy & portable
* Support R-UIM & ROM-UIM CDMA2000 1x RTT / CDMA2000 1x EVDO Rev. A, 800MHz EVDO Rev.
* A data service of up to DL 3.1Mbps/UL 1.8Mbps
* Windows 2000/XP/Vista/7 and Mac
* Price: Tk.1,890/-



Huawei EC 122
* Interface: USB type
* Convenient Plug and Play
* Support Voice,
* SMS & Micro SD card, support up to 8GB
* Superior signal reception through Mobile Receive Diversity Handy
* Support R-UIM &amo; ROM-UIM
* Supporting extra large phonebook CDMA2000 1x RTT / CDMA2000 1x EVDO Rev.A , 800MHz EVDO Rev.
* A data service of up to DL 3.1Mbps/UL 1.8Mbps
* Windows 2000/XP/Vista/7 and Mac
* Price: Tk.1,490/-



Harvilon ED 269
* Interface USB 2.0
* CDMA 2000 1X EVDO 800 MHz CDMA 2000 1X CDMA 2000 1X EVDO Rev.O/Rev.A
* Transmission Speed: DL 3.1Mbps, UL 1.8Mbps
* Support Voice & SMS Supporting extra large phonebook
* Supporting auto installing and easy uninstall of the driver Convenient * * Plug & Play
* Support R-UIM/ROM-UIM Micro SD
* Support: up to 8GB Supporting
* Windows 2000 /XP/Vista/Windows7/MAC/Linux OS
* Price: Tk.1,490/-


Currently I am using the ZTE AC682 and I am working fine with it. I am not an extreme or terrible Downloader and I always maintain my regular tasks using this Citycell Zoom Ultra modem. Another modem I am using from another GSM mobile operator company GP / GrameenPhone. Both of these devices really helps me a lot during my traveling.

Thanks a lot reading this post.


read other related posts:


Various Citycell Zoom Ultra Packages

Monday, December 24, 2012

Various Internet Settings and Packages for Robi users



Dear readers,
Today I am going to tell you about various mobile internet settings and packagesof the Robi (previous Aktel) mobile operator in Bangladesh. If you want to use any Robi internet packages with your supported handset than you have an option to choose the best one for your handset from various packages of Robi Internet. Below I am discussing about the topic, you can visit ROBI portal for more details.

Automatic settings through SMS:
For automatic internet setting options, you need to send an SMS from your handset to the number 8738. You need to just follow one of the step from the following two steps:
  1. Write the desired settings you want (e.g Internet / WAP / MMS)
  2. Handset manufacturer name (e.g Samsung/Nokia)
  3. Model name or no
  4. Send the SMS to 8738
or
  1. Write the desired settings you want (e.g Internet / WAP / MMS)
  2. 1st 8digit of handset IMEI (dial *#06# to get IMEI no)
  3. Send SMS to 8738
(from robi : The 2nd step provide most accurate result)

Follow the examples:
  • For Internet / GPRS settings: Internet<>Nokia<>E72 or Internet<> 1st 8 digit of IMEI no of your handset then send to 8738
  • For WAP Browser settings: WAP<>Nokia<>E72 or WAP<>1st 8 digit of IMEI no of your handset then send to 8738
  • For MMS settings: MMS<>Nokia<>E72 or Internet<> 1st 8 digit of IMEI no then send to 8738
  • All settings in one message: All/all/setup<>Nokia<>E72 or All/all/setup<>1st 8 digit of IMEI no then send to 8738

Internet Settings from Dialing:
Internet settings through Easy menu Dial *140*7# from your robi number and follow the instructions, you will be able to get the settings. It’s easy, take a look and try it yourself.

For manual settings (non-branded handsets):
For Internet settings:
Profile Name : Robi-INTERNET
"APN" : INTERNET
Proxy - IP & port: Not required

For WAP settings:
Profile Name : Robi-WAP
"APN" : wap
"Proxy / IP Address": 10.16.18.77
"Port" : 9028
WAP Port: 9201
HTTP Port: 9028

For MMS settings:
Profile Name : Robi-MMS
APN : WAP
"Proxy/IP" : 10.16.18.77
"Port" : 9028
"URL" : http://10.16.18.40:38090/wap

Manual Internet settings through SMS:
  • For Internet settings: Write Internet then send to 1226
  • For WAP settings: Write WAP then send to 1226
  • For MMS settings: Write MMS then send to 1226

To get Auto settings through SMS (Handset capable):
  • For Internet settings: Write Internet then send to 1227
  • For WAP settings: Write WAP then send to 1227
  • For MMS settings: Write MMS then send to 1227
  • For All (WAP ,MMS, Internet) settings: Write ALL then send to 1227
Readers,
For any further help, you can call Robi Helpline 123 or visit your nearest Robi Care Center in any city around Bangladesh. SMS charge applicable for downloading settings and with govt. VAT applicable.


Various Packages from Robi Internet Users:
Pay per use:
If you only use the Internet to check your emails and some quick browsing or chatting, this is the plan which will fit your requirement. You only have to pay for the Kilobytes you consume. Robi subscribers who use smart phones (e.g. Apple iPhones, Android handsets like Samsung Galaxy, HTC or Windows phones) to avoid using the bundle package considering the fact that these smart devices initiates internet sessions in the background to synchronize & update different applications. There is no monthly fee, no usage limit.

Charges for Pay Per Use:
On Peak hour: (9:01 AM to 12:59 AM), 2 Paisa/KB (0.02 BD Taka)
On Off Peak hour: (1:00 AM to 9:00 AM), 1 Paisa/KB (0.01 BD Taka)

Other packages:
There are lots of Bundle Packs for Robi internet users, these are Daily pack, 2 days pack, Weekly pack, Fortnightly pack and Monthly packs with a combination of different MB usage limit and promotions. Just click on the link of the official portal of robi to see more details about various packages and other promotions and offers from Robi.

Internet Migration:
If you want to change you current package than the subscriber in bundle mode cannot go on to pay per mode without migration and subscriber on pay per use mode cannot purchase bundle unless they migrate to bundle package and dial the respective package code.
Please note the below information:
  • Migration from pay per use to bundle mode: Dial *8999*00# from you Robi number and follow instructions. 
  • Migration from bundle packet to pay per use mode: Dial *8999*99# from you Robi number and follow instructions.
  • Migration charge: Free of cost
Thanks a lot for reading this post:


Read other related posts:

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Internet Data Plans from TELETALK 3G

Dear readers,
Various Internet Data Plans from TeleTalk 3G, Bangladesh is the topic of this post. After starting 3G services, TeleTalk provided some facilities for the subscribers. Two types of Internet Data Plans are offerring from Teletalk:
  • 3G Pre-paid Braodband Internet
  • 3G Post-paid Broadband Internet

Important Notes for 3G Internet Prepaid Braodband users:
  • To subscribe any 3G prepaid data plan, on SMS option Type “Subscription Code” and send to 111. For example, to subscribe Monthly 2GB Data plan for 512kbps speed, Type D20 and send to 111.
  • After depletion of data pack , pay per use policy will be applicable till subscribe subscribes to any other data plan.
  • If any volume is not used during the validity period, it will expire and will not be carried over to the next cycle.
  • The default data speed is up to 512kbps and can be enhanced up to 2Mbps as per data bundle pack.
  • For Unlimited package, fair policy will be applicable.
  • To check the Usage of Volume Bundled Package write 'u' and send SMS to 111.
  • SMS Charge not applicable.
  • 15% VAT will be included with all kind of usage.
Important Notes for 3G Internet Postpaid Braodband users:
  • To subscribe to any post paid data plan, write 'subscription code' and send to 111. For example: subscribe to monthly 4GB data plan with 512kbps speed, write F4 and send to 111.
  • After depletion of data pack within validity time 1p/10kb will be charged and after expiry of validity time, pay per use policy will be applicable till subscribe subscribes to any other data plan.
  • If any volume is not used during the validity period, it will expire and will not be carried over to the next cycle.
  • For Unlimited package, fair usage policy will be applicable.
  • To check the Usage of Volume Bundled Package write 'u' and send SMS to 111.
  • SMS Charge not applicable.
  • 15% VAT will be included.

Manual Configuration or Settings for your mobile handset for using 3G Data Service:
  • Service Type: Data Service
  • APN: wap
  • IP: 192.168.145.101 (Only if set is WAP enabled)
  • Port (optional): 9201

You can get your mobile handset settings for data services using SMS service: 
  • The handset configuration of data service can be got by sending SMS to 738. SMS sending procedure is described below:
  • Write "set" and send SMS to "738".
  • In reply SMS you will get a configuration file. Please save the configuration file in your handset. In the time of saving the file please use a pre-configured password 1234.
Readers,
In the Note section TeleTalk said that right now the configuration file supports all Nokia Handsets and Android-based Smart Phones. So, for for further NEWS and update about 3G products, services and various packages keep your eyes on the Web Portal of TeleTalk or use their Help Line (121).



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Friday, November 30, 2012

James Webb Space Telescope - The Future Hubble

The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large, infrared-optimized space-based telescope. The project is working to a 2018 launch date. The James Webb Space Telescope was named after the NASA Administrator who crafted the Apollo program, and who was a staunch supporter of space science. Webb will find the first galaxies that formed in the early Universe, connecting the Big Bang to our own Milky Way Galaxy. Webb will peer through dusty clouds to see stars forming planetary systems, connecting the Milky Way to our own Solar System. Webb's instruments will be designed to work primarily in the infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum, with some capability in the visible range. 
The Webb will be the premier observatory of the next decade, serving thousands of astronomers worldwide. It will study every phase in the history of our Universe, ranging from the first luminous glows after the Big Bang, to the formation of solar systems capable of supporting life on planets like Earth, to the evolution of our own Solar System.
Webb is an international collaboration between NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is managing the development effort. The main industrial partner is Northrop Grumman; the Space Telescope Science Institute will operate Webb after launch.
Several innovative technologies have been developed for Webb. These include a folding, segmented primary mirror, adjusted to shape after launch; ultra-lightweight beryllium optics; detectors able to record extremely weak signals, micro-shutters that enable programmable object selection for the spectrograph; and a cryo-cooler for cooling the mid-IR detectors to 7K.
Webb was formerly known as the "Next Generation Space Telescope" (NGST); it was renamed in Sept. 2002 after a former NASA administrator, James Webb. Webb will have a large mirror, 6.5 meters (21.3 feet) in diameter and a sunshield the size of a tennis court. Both the mirror and sunshade won't fit onto a rocket fully open, so both will fold up and open once Webb is in outer space. Webb will reside in an orbit about 1.5 million km (1 million miles) from the Earth.



There will be four science instruments on Webb: the Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam), the Near InfraRed Spectrograph (NIRSpec), the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), and the Fine Guidance Sensor/ Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (FGS-NIRISS). Webb's instruments will be designed to work primarily in the infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum, with some capability in the visible range. It will be sensitive to light from 0.6 to 28 micrometers in wavelength.

Webb has four main science themes: The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Re-ionization, The Assembly of Galaxies, The Birth of Stars and Proto-planetary Systems, and Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life.
Below are images of other instruments using to build the JWST:


About the Launching of the Telescope:
The Webb will be launched from Arianespace's ELA-3 launch complex at European Spaceport located near Kourou, French Guiana.

The Launch Segment has 3 primary components:
  1. Launch Vehicle: an Ariane 5 ECA with the cryogenic upper stage. It will be provided in the single launch configuration, with a long payload fairing providing a maximum 4.57 meter static diameter and useable length of 16.19 meters.
  2. Payload Adapter, comprising the Cone 3936 plus ACU 2624 lower cylinder and clamp-band, which provides the separating mechanical and electrical interface between the Webb Observatory and the Launch Vehicle.
  3. Launch campaign preparation and launch campaign. The European Space Agency (ESA) will provide the launch vehicle and the payload adapter to the Webb Mission. The launch campaign preparation and launch campaign is the mutual responsibility of NASA, ESA, NGST, and Arianespace.

All the credits for images and descriptions goes to JWST.NASA. Visit the web portal to know more about JWST.

Thanks.

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Saturday, November 24, 2012

About Hubble Space Telescope - Image and History

The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a space based telescope that was carried into orbit by a Space Shuttle in 1990 and remains in operation. A 2.4-meter (7.9 ft) aperture telescope in low Earth orbit, Hubble's four main instruments observe in the near ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared. The telescope is named after the astronomer Edwin Hubble.

Hubble's orbit outside the distortion of Earth's atmosphere allows it to take extremely sharp images with almost no background light. Hubble's Deep Field have been some of the most detailed visible-light images ever, allowing a deep view into space and time. Many Hubble observations have led to breakthroughs in astrophysics, such as accurately determining the rate of expansion of the universe.

The HST was built by the United States space agency NASA, with contributions from the European Space Agency, and is operated by the Space Telescope Science Institute. The HST is one of NASA's Great Observatories, along with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Spitzer Space Telescope.

Space telescopes were proposed as early as 1923. Hubble was funded in the 1970s, with a proposed launch in 1983, but the project was beset by technical delays, budget problems, and the Challenger disaster. When finally launched in 1990, scientists found that the main mirror had been ground incorrectly, compromising the telescope's capabilities. The telescope was restored to its intended quality by a servicing mission in 1993.

Hubble is the only telescope designed to be serviced in space by astronauts. Between 1993 and 2002, four missions repaired, upgraded, and replaced systems on the telescope; a fifth mission was canceled on safety grounds following the Columbia disaster. However, after spirited public discussion, NASA administrator Mike Griffin approved one final servicing mission, completed in 2009 by Space Shuttle Atlantis. The telescope is now expected to function until at least 2013. Its scientific successor, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), is to be launched in 2018 or possibly later.

Readers / Viewers,
This article is extremely large, I have tried to give a little history from the beginning of the Hubble Mission, including some repairing images on the space.
Credit goes to for all descriptions and images: wikipedia and hubblesite. You are requested to visit the web portals to know more details about the Telescope.

Hubble’s first servicing mission replaced and repaired various instruments, but its most important task was installing technology that corrected the tiny flaw in Hubble’s main mirror that distorted the telescope’s view. Hubble was specially designed to be repaired and upgraded by astronauts while in orbit.

As Hubble’s third repair mission unwinds, ground controllers send commands and instructions to the telescope while monitoring data from the observatory to check that it continues to function correctly. This picture, taken in 1999, shows command and control operations at the Space Telescope Operations Center at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD.

Carriers, used to transport Hubble instruments, wait in the largest clean room in the world, Goddard Space Flight Center’s 1.3-million-cubic-foot (0.036 million cubic meters) High Bay Clean Room. Clean rooms are pristine areas kept as free as possible of contaminants that could interfere with delicate technology. The platform used to anchor Hubble to the space shuttle during repair missions is kept here. Astronauts also train in the room for servicing missions.

Engineers in a clean room at Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colo., work on one of Hubble’s instruments, the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS), in 1996. The instrument, installed in Hubble in 1997, breaks light into colors, giving scientists an important analytic tool for studying the cosmos. STIS has been used to study such objects as black holes, new stars, and massive planets forming outside our solar system.

Hubble is lifted into the upright position in Lockheed Martin's acoustic vibration chamber in preparation for its 1990 launch aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery. The telescope was designed and built in the 1970s and 1980s, but its launch was delayed by the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster in 1986. A close look at this image reveals a portion of the 225 feet (68.6 m) of handrails installed around the outside for astronauts to grip during repair mission spacewalks.

Astronaut Kathy Thornton jettisons a damaged solar array panel into space during Hubble’s first servicing mission in 1993. When the solar panels were replaced, astronauts found a bend in the casing of this panel. The panel couldn't be returned safely to Earth, and was released into space. Eventually the panel will descend into Earth’s atmosphere, where the friction created by the speed of its fall will burn it up, turning it into a shooting star. Hubble’s solar panels generate power for the telescope by converting sunlight into electricity. The arrays power the telescope and charge its batteries while Hubble is in sunlight. When Hubble moves into the dark portion of its orbit, the batteries provide power.

Astronauts remove the Wide Field and Planetary Camera to replace it with its more powerful successor, Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, during Hubble’s first servicing mission in 1993. The camera, shaped something like a grand piano, weighs 610 pounds (277 kg) on Earth, but nothing in space. It can detect stars a billion times fainter than the ones we can see with our eyes. Most of Hubble’s most popular pictures have been taken with this second camera.

Astronaut F. Story Musgrave, anchored on the Space Shuttle Endeavor’s robotic arm, prepares to be elevated to the top of the Hubble Space Telescope during Hubble’s first servicing mission in 1993. Astronaut Jeffrey Hoffman, inside the shuttle payload bay, assists Musgrave.

Astronaut Steve Smith works on Hubble during the second servicing mission in 1997 with a ratchet. NASA specially designed the power tool to withstand the harsh environment of space, making it an essential item during three different Hubble missions. Hubble was specifically built to be serviced in orbit with replaceable parts and instruments. Astronauts performed four days of spacewalks during the second servicing mission to replace instruments and repair the telescope.

Astronauts Joseph Tanner – on the robotic arm – and Gregory Harbaugh replace the Hubble Space Telescope’s Fine Guidance Sensors (FGS) in 1997. The FGS are used to locate and lock onto a target star while science instruments make observations. They can also perform measurements on the positions and motions of stars. Each sensor is more than five feet (1.5 m) wide and three feet (0.9 m) long, and weighs 485 pounds (219 kg). The telescope’s pointing accuracy and stability depend heavily on the Fine Guidance Sensors.


The Hubble Space Telescope rests in the Space Shuttle Discovery’s cargo bay during the third repair mission in December 1999. Hubble must attach to the shuttle for astronauts to perform repairs. Discovery is the shuttle that originally carried Hubble into orbit in 1990. The telescope stretches five stories tall, and the tubular part of its body is 14 feet (4.2 m) across. Its school bus-size bulk completely filled Discovery’s cargo bay during the trip from Earth to space.

The Space Shuttle Discovery takes off on a mission to upgrade and repair Hubble in 1999. Once it gets close enough to Hubble, the shuttle uses its robotic arm to tow the telescope into its cargo bay for astronauts to work on. Astronauts routinely visit Hubble to perform maintenance work and install new instruments, thanks to the telescope’s unique construction with replaceable parts.

The Hubble Space Telescope hovers at the boundary of Earth and space in this picture, taken after Hubble’s second servicing mission in 1997. Hubble drifts 353 miles (569 km) above the Earth’s surface, where it can avoid the atmosphere and clearly see objects in space.

The Hubble Space Telescope drifts through space in this picture, taken by Space Shuttle Discovery during Hubble’s second servicing mission in 1997. The 10-foot aperture door, open to admit light, closes to block out space debris. The observatory’s solar panels and foil-like thermal blankets are clearly visible. The solar panels provide power, while the thermal blankets protect Hubble from the extreme temperatures of space.

The revamped Hubble Space Telescope, fresh from its fourth visit by astronauts, sports new solar arrays on its outside, and new instruments inside. The new solar arrays, which collect sunlight to power the telescope, are smaller than the previous ones, but more powerful. This image was taken shortly after Hubble separated from the Columbia space shuttle in March 2002, making it the most up-to-date picture of the Hubble Space Telescope.

The Hubble Space Telescope floats against the background of Earth after a week of repair and upgrade by Space Shuttle Columbia astronauts in 2002. Hubble’s fourth servicing mission gave the telescope its first new instrument installed since the 1997 repair mission – the Advanced Camera for Surveys. It doubled Hubble’s field of view and records information much faster than Hubble’s Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2.

The Space Shuttle Atlantis' robotic arm lifts the Hubble Space Telescope from the cargo bay on May 19, 2009, moments away from releasing the observatory to resume its travels around Earth. The release concluded Servicing Mission 4, the fifth astronaut visit to the telescope. Astronauts installed two new instruments, fixed two others, and performed numerous other repairs and upgrades.

While standing on the end of Atlantis' robotic arm, Astronaut Michael Good uses a power tool to perform work on the Hubble Space Telescope on May 15, 2009. Servicing Mission 4 was one of the most active and intense of the Hubble missions.

Astronaut Andrew Feustel, positioned on a foot restraint on the end of Atlantis' robotic arm, participates in Servicing Mission 4's third spacewalk on May 16, 2009. Over the six-hour, 36-minute spacewalk, Feustel and Astronaut John Grunsfeld removed the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement, installed the new Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, and worked to repair the Advanced Camera for Surveys.

Astronaut Andrew Feustel, perched on the end of the robotic arm, helps to install the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) during a May 14, 2009, spacewalk to perform work on the Hubble Space Telescope. Wide Field Camera 3 is one of two new instruments installed during Servicing Mission 4, the fifth astronaut visit to Hubble.

Hubble drifts over Earth after its release on May 19, 2009 by the crew of the Space Shuttle Atlantis. The crew had performed all planned tasks over the course of five spacewalks, making the Servicing Mission 4, the fifth astronaut visit to the Hubble Space Telescope, an unqualified success.

The Space Shuttle Atlantis moves away from Hubble after the telescope’s release on May 19, 2009 concluded Servicing Mission 4. The Soft Capture Mechanism, a ring that a future robotic mission can grapple in order to de-orbit the telescope, is visible in the center.

The Hubble Space Telescope in a picture snapped by a Servicing Mission 4 crew members just after the Space Shuttle Atlantis captured Hubble with its robotic arm on May 13, 2009, beginning the mission to upgrade and repair the telescope.

Thanks a lot.


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